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Hackers are getting more brazen and passwords are becoming huge of a pain as we keep signing up for services. Password managers help ease the pain of dealing with security over multiple sites and services, but for the most part, our computing lives are open to anyone with even marginal hacking skills. Google thinks it can fix that with Project Vault, a secure device that plugs into any system both desktop or mobile that supports microSD. The device runs its own ultra-secure operating system that's partitioned from the rest of the host device with 4GB of storage for your most sensitive data.

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Panasonic has been a huge proponent of 4K-ready cameras, starting with the Lumix GH4 and LX100. A few days ago, the Lumix G7 joined that group. The recently introduced Micro Four Thirds camera features a 16-megapixel Digital Live MOS sensor, an ISO range of up to 25,600 and a quad-core CPU for speedy image processing. But here's the one thing it does best: 4K. More specifically, I'm talking about Panasonic's 4K Photo feature, which lets you extract high-resolution pictures from 4K, 30 fps videos and save them at an 8-megapixel equivalent. This is particularly useful when you shoot moving subjects, as you're able to record a 4K video (roughly up to 30 minutes), choose whatever frame you want from it and save that to the camera's SD card. Is it cheating? Perhaps, but it works perfectly.

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It seems like a decent of chunk of Google's big news today deals with its partnerships. The search giant is already teaming up with Levi's to explore the realm of smart Jacquard clothes, and now Google has confirmed that it's been working with Qualcomm to build its Project Tango world-sensing cameras into the chipmaker's reference phone designs. Those Tango-phones will be seeded developers and devices makers for now, and thanks to the arcane decisions that ultimately define a company's device-making strategy, we might not ever actually see a consumer-ready Tango phone. Still, Google's long-term ambitions are pretty clear: It'd like to get these Tango devices into our pockets en masse, and a closer relationship with one of the world's biggest mobile chipmakers is a great way to do it.

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Gesture-based system are usually attached to video game consoles like the Microsoft Kinect or your computer like the Leap Motion. Google's ATAP team figured that the smaller form factor of the smartwatch segment needed its own finger-waving way to control the devices without having to reply on the smartphone. It's Project Soli replaces the physical controls of smartwatches with your hands using radar to capture your movements.

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Remember Path, the social network for keeping in touch with your closest friends and family? Unless you live in Indonesia, probably not. And that's part of the reason why it ended selling its social networking apps to Daum Kakao, the Korean parent company of the messaging app KakaoTalk. Path was founded five years ago with a more intimate and well-designed take on social networking, and it snagged 10 million users in that time. But aside from some initial pickup in tech centers like San Francisco and New York City, most of its growth ended up being in Latin America and Southeast Asia (more than half of its users are based in Indonesia). Specifically, Daum Kakao is picking up the core Path app and Path Talk, a standalone chat app it launched last year. Path the company will live on with its animated GIF app Kong, and it likely has some other projects in the works too.

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When the US Bureau of Industry and Security published how it plans to implement the sections on hacking technologies in a global weapons trade pact called the Wassenaar Arrangement (WA) last week, it ignited an online firestorm of meltdowns, freakouts, and vicious infighting within the most respected circles of hacking and computer security. That's because the new rules change the classification of intrusion software and Internet Protocol (IP) network communications surveillance -- setting in motion a legal machine that might see penetration-testing tools, exploits and zero-days criminalized.

Some suggest the new classifications also seem designed to give the US a market advantage over the buying, selling, import and export of certain tools used in cyberwar -- a currently black market, in which the US government is already the biggest player.

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Remember when we said yesterday that Google's Project Jacquard would lead to the advent of touch-friendly pants? Well, we were more right than we thought: During the Google ATAP address here at Google I/O 2015, Technical Program Lead Ivan Poupyrev confirmed that the search giant is teaming up with Levi's to help bridge the gap between Jacquard's technically complex fabrics and the seemingly arcane world of fashion. "We think about Jacquard as a raw material that will make computation a part of the language which apparel designers and textile designers and fashion designers speak," he said. "We want digital to be just the same thing as quality of yarn or colors used," referring to how fundamental these sorts of connected considerations should be.

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CLIMATE CHANGE, OCEANS RISING

The human race is doomed, and it's all our own fault. With the quantity of carbon in our atmosphere now well beyond the safe limit, it's almost certain the planet's temperature will continue to rise. Climate change is causing natural disasters of biblical proportions; a situation that's only going to get worse as time progresses. We all need to work harder to improve this situation by using less energy and behaving more responsibly. But since some people will never be convinced the Earth's rapidly approaching the end of its humanity-hospitable era, we're now in dire need of alternative options to save us from ourselves. To help get the word out, we've compiled a list of some of the most exciting scientific projects we've seen of late that could, if successful, undo some or all of the damage we've caused.

[Image: Lisa Werner / Alamy]

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Handpick, a recipe app that helps users craft meals using ingredients they have on-hand, now scours the filtered seas of Instagram for delicious-looking dishes and their accompanying recipes. This means the next time you're searching (or drooling) through "#food" on Instagram, you might be able to actually whip up whatever catches your eye. Handpick uses a mix of algorithm and human curation to find matching food posts and recipes, CEO Payman Nejati says (via TheNextWeb): "Instagram is effectively a database of over 1 billion food posts. We started analyzing that data through the public API and using computer vision, we know whether a post is about food. We then look at the caption and use that information to match recipes to social media posts."

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This post was done in partnership with The Sweethome, a list of the best gear for your home. Read the full article at TheSweethome.com

If you need an all-purpose digital kitchen scale for baking, cooking by ratio, or even measuring beans to brew coffee, the Jennings CJ4000 ($26) combines some of the best features we've seen in a scale. It's easy to use and store, comes with an AC adapter to save on batteries, and you can disable the auto-off function so you can take your sweet time mixing or brewing. The Jennings costs only a few dollars more than a bare-bones model, but does something none of them can: it measures in half grams for even better precision.

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