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Dropbox Carousel on an iPhone

The photo backup features in mobile apps like Dropbox's Carousel and Google+ are there partly to take the load off of your phone -- you don't have to keep every shot close at hand. Wouldn't it be nice if the software got rid of local images when they're merely taking up space? Apparently, it will soon. Dropbox is giving some Carousel users a "sneak peek" at a feature that offers to scrap local photos (after they've been backed up, of course) when your device storage is almost full. It's a simple gesture, but it could save you some time; you won't have to fret over which pictures to delete just to make sure you can snap a few new ones. We've reached out to Dropbox to get an inkling of when this feature will be available to everyone, and we'll let you know if it can provide a timetable.

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Comcast

When it comes to offering great customer service, Comcast's reputation on the matter is far from being healthy. Every now and then, the company gets put on the map for making its subscribers go through rather tedious experiences -- to get an idea, just listen to the recording of this call. But Comcast knows it can do better, so it's taking some necessary steps to get to where it wants to be. As such, it is now testing a feature that lets its customers track and rate technicians whenever they have a scheduled appointment.

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Looks as if the list of things that Amazon doesn't sell just got that little bit shorter after the company started connecting people with local contractors. Customers in a handful of trial cities, including NYC and Seattle, can now use an Angie's List-style site to get tradespeople to visit your home for services. For instance, search for a TV wall bracket on the site and you'll be able to find a professional TV mounter to come and drill the holes so you don't have to. Right now, it's only a limited trial, but imagine if Amazon eventually bundled this sort of thing into Prime? We'd never have to shell out big bucks for an emergency plumber ever again.

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Twitter has been dabbling in timeline-based purchases already, and its latest effort will boost commerce-driven tweeting. Twitter Offers serves up discounts from participating retailers that you'll be able to grab right from the tweet -- so long as you've linked a credit or debit card to sort the funds, of course. To leverage the deal, all you have to do is pay online or at a physical location with the same card. The social network will charge companies to promote their offer-packed messages, and could later opt to bill for every deal that's claimed according to Re/code. Twitter acquired online coupon/payment startup CardSpring earlier this year to power the offering, and discounts will begin appearing as early as today. Perfect timing for the Black Friday scrum, no?

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Lyft on the highway

App-based carpooling options like Lyft Line and UberPool are useful if you'd rather not drive to work yourself... but what if you do drive, and want to make a little money on the side? That's where Lyft's newest offering, Driver Destination, could come into play. The tier lets you only accept Lyft Line requests from people who are headed the same way, with few if any detours; your trip home shouldn't turn into an epic journey just because you picked up someone who lives off the beaten path. If you're willing to make it a staple of your commute, Lyft reckons that you could make as much as $400 more per month. That's not spectacular, but it's enough to pay for large bills or a lavish night out.

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ENIAC circa 1946

Seeing ENIAC, one of the first true programmable computers, has been tricky; the giant mainframe was partly restored in 2007, but it was only visible in an office building. At last, though, you now have a (relatively) easy way to witness this piece of computing history first-hand. The US Army's Field Artillery Museum in Fort Sill, Oklahoma recently put several of ENIAC's revived panels on public display, giving you a chance to see a significant chunk of the very early mainframe in person.

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Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro review: slim and sexy comes with some trade-offs

I haven't reviewed an Ultrabook in months. It's not because I've grown lazy; it's because there just haven't been many new models to test. Nearly every laptop that crosses Engadget's reviews desk these days is a gaming notebook, a Chromebook or maybe one of those super-cheap netbook things. So here I am, dusting off my Ultrabook-testing skills with the Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro, the company's latest flagship laptop. Like every Yoga that's come before it, this new model has a 360-degree hinge that allows it to fold back into tablet mode. It also keeps that stunning 3,200 x 1,800 touchscreen. But that's not what's interesting to me. No, I'm curious about this because it's the first notebook I'm testing with a new Intel Core M chip, which allows the Yoga 3 Pro to be 17 percent thinner than its predecessor, not to mention 15 percent lighter. As a result of moving to a lower-powered chip, the battery life should be better too. Sounds like a recipe for an all-around better Ultrabook, right?

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City Of Hope Spirit Of Life Gala Honoring Apple's Eddy Cue

Mozilla is making the switch to Yahoo search from Google for its default option in the US, and Apple's browser deal will soon be up for renewal, too. The Information reports that Mayer & Co. are in play there as well, and of course, Microsoft is pitching Bing to the folks in Cupertino -- mainly senior VP of internet software and services Eddy Cue. The latter search engine already sorts Siri's questions, and Apple made the move to swap in local query option Baidu in China for Safari's default method of scanning the web. Yahoo search is powered by Bing, so coupling that with the fact that it's already the go-to option for some of Apple's services wouldn't make it too much of a stretch for Redmond's effort to replace Google. And there's Cupertino's continued efforts to tamp down on its reliance on Mountain View, too.

[Photo credit: Lester Cohen/Getty Images for City Of Hope]

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2014 George Foster Peabody Awards

Sure, there are plenty of hilarious videos on YouTube, but even the best parkour-fail clip can't compare to a bang-on episode of South Park or Key and Peele. In that case, your Chromecast is about to get a a few more laughs thanks to the Comedy Central mobile app getting support for Google's streaming stick. There's some kid-friendly fare en route too -- Sesame Street Go and Nickelodeon will soon be castable to your flat-screen as well. You'll almost positively need a cable subscription (or know someone with one) to access the respective TV-network content, and to pay a separate fee to beam Big Bird to your big-screen. Don't have those? Well, until then, there's always Scrabble to help pass the time.

[Image credit: Evan Agostini/Invision/AP]

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Attention, scientists, hobbyists and anyone in between who can design a mean CubeSat, or a mini cube-like satellite, for space exploration: registration is now open for NASA's Cube Quest contest, and the agency's giving out cash prizes worth a total of $5 million. NASA's no stranger to holding competitions in an effort to tap into the brilliant minds of folks outside their roster of employees, but this one is a lot bigger than many of its previous events. See, contenders will compete not only for cash prizes, but also for a spot on the Orion spacecraft during its first integrated flight with the agency's upcoming monster rocket called Space Launch System.

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